Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Syracuse battle the Persians - To The Strongest

The lines of battle start to take shape as the rival units of hoplites prepare to come to grips!


What a wonderful game I participated in last night!


Jeff Champion and I played a superb battle of " To The Strongest", the sensational ancients rules from the very clever Simon Miller.  I must say that for me, these rules have reinvigorated my love for ancient wargaming and I do find them so enjoyable and at the same time a very good simulation of my thoughts and perceptions of what ancient warfare may have been.
I had also been recently inspired by Peter's wonderful battle reports and accounts of his groups games on his excellent blog ""Blunders on the Danube"  If you can spare a moment, pop over a have a look at his wonderful TTS battles.


The battle was a 160 point a side affair with stratagems and the terrain formalities dispensed with so we could get right into the game.  Some random terrain was scattered about the field and each player was able to move a couple of things as he saw fit, which I think neither of us bothered with.


Jeff's central command made up of his collection of lovely Victrix Hoplites I believe.  In the background
Steve and Cookie are also playing in a TSS game involving Romans and Gaul's.

A view across the flank to his dastardly yet inept scutarii.

Slingers and Hoplites make up my the central command.

Scythed Chariots, Kardakes, Apple Bearers and Mardian archers - what a force!

Colonist cavalry, Median mounted and Saka with a tough group of Takabara for good measure in the rough.

I quite like my eastern style camps and baggage made up of some Castaway Arts gear from Gerry Webb.

These scythed chariots are old Naismith models and still look fantastic.

The to and fro in the centre would go on all night.

On the right I narrowly missed my chance to destroy a hoplite unit on the flank with Median Cavalry.  They have
now ominously occupied the hill and prepare to try and squeeze the life out of my left flank.

My Mardian archers could not hit the side of a barn but actually fought well in hand to hand combat.  Go figure!


I decided the rough was important and allocated a hero to my Takabara unit.  You can see my cavalry on the
flank of the hoplites in the background however they would soon be destroyed by enemy lights and cavalry.





A view from the Syracusan lines.

Lovely Vendel miniatures here which I believe are now manufactured in America.

Who doesn't love Greek Hoplite shields?  Theses are all hand painted which is incredible - well done Leroy.


The game finished with a narrow but well deserved victory to the Syracusans.  Jeff, who is an acclaimed acclaimed, published author on the classical period, actually wrote the Syracusan list for Simon and is a great chap to play against.  As a member of the NWS for decades together its amazing how few games we have actually played together in.  I think that these rules will help ensure that many more battles being fought across and alongside the tables edge will be a mere formality.

27 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thanks Jonathan - the aesthetics are such a big part of the enjoyment of these games.

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    2. Game aesthetics is why we play with miniatures and not cardboard!

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  2. Great looking game- interesting rules.

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    1. Cheers John and the rules are very interesting indeed.

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  3. Great looking game, love the scythed chariots!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thank you very much Iain. Yes the scythed chariots look great and they were surprisingly effective early however they did get a bit of a showing to from the hoplites.

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  4. Great to see you guys enjoying the rules. You must have quite a few games under your belt now Carlos.

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    1. Cheers Guido and yes, a few games now. Beautiful rules system designed by Simon.

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  5. Thanks chaps! What a great-looking game, and on the Sagebrush Steppe mat, too, which goes great with the bases. I'm glad you had fun. Jeff has been a great help with that particular list, and some others, too!

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    1. Credit where credits due Simon - great set of rules!
      Yes the mat works out very well and the basing compliments it perfectly. Jeff is a good man that's for sure.

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  6. Replies
    1. Thank you Christopher and I think that the aesthetics are such a big part of my enjoyment of these battles and these rules. The figures on a large base allows so much scope for vignettes and attractive basing and they also make it very easy to deploy and pack-up at the end of the game.

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  7. Most impressive and beautiful Scythed Chariots and armies...splendid!

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    1. Cheers Phil. Those chariots must be over thirty tears old and still look fantastic. The animated and differing poses on the horses make a massive difference and it is a model which also looks like it is built for destructive power and speed rather than durability. Hence the finer sculpting of the body of the chariot itself. I think the newer versions of scythed chariots all look a bit clunky and heavy.

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  8. Wonderful looking game, Carlo! Thank]s for the tip of the hat, too. I just ran 2 games with TtS! again at Historicon last week. One report is up, and another to come!

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    1. Always a pleasure young Peter. Love all your reports mate and your games are looking fantastic.

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    2. Young, eh? At age 62, not exactly, LOL!

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    3. We're all young at heart Peter.

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  9. Looks very nice, excellent work!

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    1. Thanks Mark - greatly appreciated.

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  10. Lots of great figures on display Carlo.

    Some of the figures may have a few kilometers on the clock but from my standpoint that just adds a certain degree of charm to them ... and I'm hardly biased in this matter at all!! 8O))

    Salute
    von Peter himself

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    1. Thanks Peter. It is true some of those older figures are very anayomivally correct and do look sensational.

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